Som moo version 1.0

Charcuterie All over the world cultures participate in meat preserving traditions. The word charcuterie has become the catch-all term referring to the products of meat preservation. Charcuterie itself is a French word – referring literally to the store that sells tasty things – and conjures up images of wood platters loaded with thinly sliced European dry-aged […]

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Nonno Sananikone

Charlie has taught me a lot about Lao food. In conversations he’s distilled his experience as a first-gen Lao-Canadian. His memories of his childhood in Vanastra – surrounded by recent refugee arrivals from Laos, and the ways that the food culture helped integrate new-comers and experience community – have been critical to the narrative of […]

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The thing about labels

“Like with the spicy thing, I don’t know how to do that – it’s not in my culture, we don’t do the mild, medium, hot, suicide, extreme because at the end of that scale is real ethnic spicy that people eat every day. We didn’t have to invent that system. We’ve already toned it down […]

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“With a bit of luck, his life was ruined forever. Always thinking that just behind some narrow door in all of his favorite bars, men in red woolen shirts are getting incredible kicks from things he’ll never know.” – Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas Early in the service, Hilde brings back […]

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Larb, lahb, laab, lahp, lap, laap – all you do is talk.

“You should try the larb,” Charlie tells a first time guest. “It’s the national dish of Laos.” He’s referring to chicken larb, or larb gai, the restaurant’s take on the popular marinated meat salad. The larb is finely minced chicken fragrant with herbs, a small dousing of fish sauce, lime juice, chilies, and scallions, complimented with […]

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